Northview High School

Soccer Field Light and Fence Proposal:

A Presentation to the Clay Community Schools

Board of Trustees

 

Prepared by Andrew P. Thomas

 January 10, 2013

 

 

C:\Mitchell Thomas\2012 soccer pictures\100_5854.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                                Page

Executive Summary………………………………………………………………….......................……………3

 

Proposal………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4

 

Background

A.      Popularity of Soccer in the World………………………………………………………………4

B.      Popularity of Soccer in the U.S…………………………………………………………………..4

C.      Popularity of Soccer in Indiana………………………………………………………………….7

D.     Soccer in Clay County……………………………………………………………………………….9

 

Problems from Lack of Lighting at Northview High School

A.      Safety of the Players………………………………………………………………………………..11

B.      Loss of Income…………………………………………………………………………………………12

C.      Loss of Opportunity for Boys and Girls Soccer…………………………………………12

 

Previous Efforts to Obtain Lighting…………………………………………………………………………..13

 

The Current Proposal

A.      Light…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………13

B.      Fence………………………………………………………………………………………………………15

C.      Soccer Field Improvements……………………………………………………………………..16

 

Sources of Funding

A.      Clay Community Schools…………………………………………………………………………17

B.      Grants…………………………………………………………………………………………………….17

C.      Community Sponsors……………………………………………………………………………...18

 

Appendix

A.      Cost per Participant………………….……………………………………………………………19

B.      Clay Community Schools Capital Fund Budget for 2012…………………………20

C.      Northview High School Lighting Estimate………………………………………………21

D.     Sullivan High School Lighting Estimate…………………………………………………..22

E.      Pictures of Northview High School Soccer Field…………………………………….23

F.       Pictures of Sullivan High School Soccer Field…………………………………………24

G.     Pictures of West Vigo High School Soccer Field..…………………………………..25

H.     Northview Shocks Visiting Terre Haute South……………………………………….26

I.        Northview Boys Top Owen Valley…………………………………………………………28

J.        Knights End Regular Season with Soccer Victory…………………………………,29

K.      Northview Girls Edge Past North Knox………………………………………………….31

L.       Soccer Players Raise Money for Trip…………………………………………………….33

M.   Soccer Team Volunteering in the Brazil Community…………………………….35

N.     Lighting Standards of the US Foundation……………………………………………..36

O.     U.S. Soccer Foundation Grant………………………………………………………………37

Executive Summary

 

Although Northview High School has the largest student enrollment in the seven schools in the Western Indiana Conference, Northview does not have soccer field lights and fence while five other schools in the conference do. The lack of lights and fence creates problems relating to safety of the players, loss of income and loss of opportunity for boy and girl soccer players. In the 2012 season, two varsity boys’ soccer games were stopped because there were no lights. The solution is to construct lights and fence as the other schools have at a very reasonable cost.

 

Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. Soccer is growing fast in the U.S. and Indiana. Soccer is simple and has a very low cost per participant compared to other sports. Soccer includes both boys and girls. Some Northview High School graduates have played soccer in college. There are soccer college scholarships available.

 

The Northview boys’ soccer team, consisting of 32 varsity and junior varsity players, is coached by Dustin Jorgensen, a former Northview soccer player. The team improved from 3-13 in 2011 to 6-8-1 in the regular 2012 season. The Northview boys’ team beat Terre Haute South in the 2012 regular season. The Northview girls’ soccer team coach is Lauren Trennel. The team finished 7-7-1 and 4-2 in the WIC in the 2012 regular season.

 

The installation of lights and fence are needed because:

 

·         Fencing and lights will increase gate fee receipts

·         Prevention of injury to the players and fans

·         Players will have more playing time

·         Fencing benefits both soccer and softball programs

·         Players will become more competitive with other teams

·         More events such as sectionals, jamborees, tournaments

·         The YMCA can use the lights and fence for over 200 youth

·         It is only fair since the football field, the baseball field, the softball field, and the tennis courts have lights

 

 

 

 


 

Northview High School Soccer Field Light and Fence Proposal:

A Presentation to the Clay Community School Board

Prepared by Andrew P. Thomas

January 10, 2013

 

 

Proposal

 

This is a proposal to install lights and fenceat the Northview High School soccer field. Doing so will prevent injuries, increase income and provide an opportunity for more boys and girls to participate in the soccer program. The proposal requests:

 

1.      A sum of $115,000 for soccer field lights in the 2014 Capital Projects Fund

2.      A sum of $10,000 for additional fencing around the soccer field and the girls softball diamond

3.      A sum of $10,000 for improvements to the soccer field

4.      Authority for the Clay Youth Soccer Club to assist raising funds for these projects from corporate sponsorships, grant applications to the U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Wabash Valley Community Foundation, and other fundraising activities

 

Background

 

A.      Popularity of Soccer in the World

 

Soccer is the most popular sport in the world.[1]According to a 2001 FIFA survey, over 240 million people regularly play soccer in more than 200 countries, in every part of the world.[2]“Soccer is a very simple sport. You can play it anywhere and with anything, The rules are simple. It’s a sport spectators can enjoy without knowing all the ins and outs of the game. ... The sport is one all kids can play. You don’t have to be a certain size.” [3]

 

B.      Popularity of Soccer in the U.S.

Youth Sports Statistics

U.S. Youth Soccer Annual Registration of Players has grown from 103,432 in 1974 to 3,025,551 in 2011.[4]“Soccer trails only basketball in the number of participants. It's the most popular sport for womenamong NCAA schools. That's been true for a long time.”[5]In 2008, 52% of the soccer players were men and 48% were women.[6]

The cost per soccer player participant is lower than most other sports.[7]

 

Youth Sport Statistics

Source:Minnesota Amateur Sports Commission, Athletic Footwear Association, USA Today Survey, Michigan State

Date Verified: 1.26.2012

 

Youth Sport Statistics (Ages 5-18)

Data

Number of kids who play organized sports each year

35 Million

Percent of kids who play sports outside of school

60%

Percent of boys who play organized sports

66%

Percent of girls who play organized sports

52%

Percent of coaches who are dads coaching their own kids

85%

Percent of corporation executives who played sports

73%

 

High School Sports Numbers

Data

Number of boys playing high school soccer

284,000

Number of girls playing high school soccer

209,000

Number of boys playing high school football

1 Million

Number of boys playing high school basketball

500,000

 

Female Sports Statistics (Women’s Sports Foundation)

Female high school athletes are 92% less likely to get involved with drugs

Female high school athletes are 80% less likely to get pregnant

Female high school athletes are 3 time more likely to graduate than non-athletes

 

Odds of Going Pro

Odds

Odds of a High School football player making it to the NFL

1 in 6,000

Odds of a High School basketball player making it to the NBA

1 in 10,000

Doss of a High School soccer player receiving a full ride to a Div I or II School

1 in 90

 

The following is from a study done by Michigan State on Youth Sports. 10,000 kids’ ages 5-14 nation-wide were surveyed.

 

Statistic

Data

Percent who participate in sports to be with friends

65%

Percent who were reluctant to play sports

15%

Percent who wanted to improve their sports skills

20%

Percent who said they wouldn’t care if no score was kept in their games

71%

Percent who said they wished no parents would watch them play

37%

Percent who said they see other kids act like poor sports frequently

51 %

Percent who would prefer to be on a losing team if they could play rather than warm the bench on a winning team

90%

Percent of kids who said they had been called names, or insulted by coaches

45.3%

Percent who said they planned to stop playing the next year

35%

 

Total Number of Allowable Sports Scholarships

Division I Sports

Men’s

Women’s

Baseball / Softball

11.7

12

Basketball

13

15

Track & Field

12.6

18

Football

85

0

Golf

4.5

6

Gymnastics

6.3

12

Field Hockey

0

12

Ice Hockey

18

18

Lacrosse

12.6

12

Rowing

0

20

Soccer

9.9

12

Swimming / Diving

9.9

8.1

Tennis

4.5

8

Volleyball

4.5

12

Water Polo

4.5

8

Wrestling

9.9

0

Division II Sports

Men’s

Women’s

Baseball / Softball

9

7.2

Badminton

0

10

Basketball

10

10

Bowling

0

5

Track & Field

12.69

12.69

Fencing

4.5

4.5

Football

36

0

Golf

3.6

5.4

Gymnastics

5.4

6

Handball

0

12

Field Hockey

0

6.3

Ice Hockey

13.5

18

Lacrosse

10.8

9.9

Rifle

3.6

7.2

Rowing

0

20

Skiing

6.3

6.3

Soccer

9

9.9

Squash

9

7.2

Swimming / Diving

0

9

Synchronized Swimming

0

5

Tennis

4.5

6

Volleyball

4.5

8

Water Polo

4.5

8

Wrestling

9

0

 

C.      Popularity of Soccer in Indiana

 

1.       Indiana University Soccer Team

 

“By a number of indicators, the Hoosiers are one of the greatest soccer programs in the history of the sport. The Hoosiers have won eight national championships in men's soccer (1982, 1983, 1988, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2012), second only to St. Louis' 10. Indiana owns more wins, has appeared in more College Cups (18) and has a higher winning percentage in both regular season and post-season play than any other school in Division I soccer… Every year since the NCAA began tracking men's soccer attendance in 2001, the IU program has ranked among the top three in average or total attendance. Indiana led the nation in average attendance in 2004 and 2005 and in total attendance in 2003. The Hoosiers are currently coached by Todd Yeagley, the son of former Indiana Hall of Fame coach Jerry Yeagley.[8]

 

2.       Lawrence, Indiana

 

The Lawrence Soccer Complex is well-placed on the corner of North Franklin Road and Harmon Way, which is the northwest tip of Lawrence Community Park. With 21 well-lit, full-sized soccer fields and parking that can accommodated 8,000 vehicles, the Soccer Complex in Lawrence, Indiana attracts legions of active Lawrence children and greater Indianapolis children from  many other nearby suburban cities in Central Indiana.[9]

 

3.       Westfield, Indiana

 

Indiana Soccer intends to relocate its state offices and all operations to Westfield's Grand Park.  Indiana Soccer has approximately 85,000 members state-wide including youth players, adult players, coaches, referees and club volunteers.  There are over 130 local member clubs across the State of Indiana, dedicated to the betterment of youth and our communities through soccer.  With the addition of this anchor, Grand Park is expected to attract over 500,000 people annually.  Grand Park is also expected to generate $3.5 million in surrounding area shopping (annually), $4.8 million in meals purchased (annually), $2.2 million in hotel revenue (annually) and in the first three years, produce 2300 jobs. The Grand Park Sports Campus is a planned 350-acre development sure to become a family destination like no other.  Grand Park will feature a full-range of championship-level facilities including 26 outdoor baseball and softball fields - turf and grass, 32 outdoor soccer, lacrosse, football, rugby and field hockey fields -turf and grass, and an indoor facility.  The fields will be surrounded by dining, retail and entertainment venues, all geared toward supporting and enhancing the family sports atmosphere and experience.    Anchors include Westfield Youth Sports, Westfield Youth Soccer, Indiana Bulls and Indiana Soccer Association. 

 

 

 

 

4.       Professional Indiana Soccer Team[10]

“A group of Indianapolis business executives is laying the groundwork to launch a professional soccer team here in 2014.Members of the group, who have remained private to date, launched a website this month www.indyprosoccer.com —seeking input into the team’s stadium and pledges for season tickets. They’re also taking suggestions for a name and colors for the team, which would play in the North American Soccer League but would consider joining Major League Soccer in the future.Your input will have a huge impact to bring the professional team to Indianapolis. For this reason, Indiana Soccer encourages you to visit the website www.indyprosoccer.com and provide your suggestions about the name and the colors of the team!

The group has hired Peter Wilt, 25-year soccer executive and former President and General Manager of Major League Soccer’s Chicago Fire, to advance its bid.

Faberge, Baker Daniels partner and former Republican state senator Murray Clark said he knows the members of the group and is confident they have the juice to start and operate a pro soccer team.

“The business acumen of this group is at a very, very high level,” said Clark, board chairman for the Indiana Soccer Association, a group that has about 60,000 youth and 6,000 adult members. “Peter Wilt is well known in soccer circles nationally and brings a real measure of credibility to this effort. This is a very substantive initiative.”

Indiana Soccer Association believes that once this initiative is defined and good to go, it will elevate the popularity of the game in the state of Indiana and bring many more people to play the most popular sport in the world. 

Channel 8 interviewed the Indiana Soccer director of education, Steve Franklin and George Perry, commissioner of the Indiana Soccer League (ISL) to get their impressions and feelings about the professional team in Indianapolis.

“Having watched many of the superstars like Pele, Cuff, Beckenbauer and Best in the old NASL growing up in Rochester, it allowed me the role models to hone my own skills as a player. Having our own NASL team in Indianapolis will give our youth players an opportunity to see soccer played.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.      Soccer in Clay County.

 

Northview High School.The Northview varsity and junior varsity boys and girls soccer program began about 15 years ago.

C:\Mitchell Thomas\2012 soccer pictures\100_3116.JPG

2012 Boys’ Varsity Soccer Team

 

 

YMCA. The Clay County YMCA boys and girls have used the school corporation soccer fields for at least 10 years. In 2012, over 217 players participated in CYSC in the Spring and Fall leagues. Lights could help at least 217 YMCA boys and girls a year if lights were needed for games and practices.

 

YMCA statistics

(Boys and Girls)[11]

 

 

 

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

Spring

213

238

201

217

Fall

141

156

150

108

 

Clay Youth Soccer Club (CYSC). The CYSC is a nonprofit club which was founded in 2006 to promote soccer for Clay County middle school and younger players. The Club has expanded to include grade school to high school players. The Club players have traveled throughout the state in numerous tournaments.  The use of the field provides opportunity for higher level play for a wide age range of players.  Many of the Clay County soccer players must travel  outside Clay County in the off season to play soccer because of limited soccer facilities. Players have been forced to join teams in Terre Haute, Greencastle, Bloomington, and Lafayette because Clay County does not have adequate soccer programs in the off season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Schools in the Western Indiana Conference

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a1/Indiana_%28WIC%29.PNG/250px-Indiana_%28WIC%29.PNG

 

School

Men Varsity Coach

School Enrollment

Men Varsity Players

Soccer Field Lights

 

 

Northview

Dustin Jorgensen

1142

21

No

 

Owen Valley

Chris Hege

908

19

No

 

Edgewood

Carl Salzmann

833

 

Yes

 

Brown County

Travis Herb

755

19

Yes

 

West Vigo

Juan Montanez

640

18

Yes

 

S Vermillion

Ryan Humphrey

583

 

Yes

 

Sullivan

Jeff Frost

543

19

Yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Problems from Lack of Lights and Fenceat Northview High School Soccer Field

 

View of Northview Soccer Field with Softball Field Lights in the Background

 

 

A.      Safety of the Players

 

Studies about soccer injuries have found that lights help prevent severe player injuries. Several studies have shown playing field conditions are a factor with player injuries. In The Ultimate Guide to Soccer Safety for Players, Parents and Coaches[12] by J.R. Justesen, it states:

 

“Interestingly, while the lighting is being provided to allow players to play and enjoy the game, this becomes a secondary concern to the safety aspects of providing appropriate lighting for the participants to safely run on a typically uneven surface and avoid collisions with fast moving    people, the ball, or any objects such as goal posts, and training aids.”

 

A separate study also found:

 

“From these results and the analysis of injuries in specific body parts, the following factors were determined to influence the occurrence of severe injuries: 1) personal factors (intrinsic): age of player, previous injuries, joint instability, abnormality of the spine, poor physical condition, poor football skills, or inadequate treatment and rehabilitation of injuries; 2) environmental factors (extrinsic): subjective exercise overload during practices and games, amount and quality of training, playing field conditions.”[13]

 

C:\Mitchell Thomas\2012 soccer pictures\100_5730.JPG

 

The U.S. Soccer Foundation has created some lighting standards for soccer fields to “establish criteria important to the safe conduct of soccer activities and which will heighten the players’ and fans’ positive experience at the field.

 

B.      Loss of Income

 

1.      More Games and Tournaments.

 

It seems obvious if lighting is installed around the soccer fields, there would be more gate income because there could be more games, including both boys and girls. For instance, since West Vigo has lights, it hosts a jamboree in early August each year. Northview cannot host such events. Northview cannot host sectional games because there are not lights or fencing. Other tournaments, such as a 3 x 3 tournament, could be hosted at Northview High School. In the Spring of 2012, Northview High School hosted a successful 3 x 3 soccer tournament. Such a tournament is popular because only 3 soccer players are needed for each team. A coach is not necessary. In Putnam County, a successful 3 x 3 soccer tournament was held in the Fall of 2011. Each team pays $75 to enter the tournament. It is estimated that the Putnam County Youth Soccer Club grossed over $1000 for the one day event. The Indiana 3 x 3 Live Soccer Tournaments have offered to hold a tournament at Northview High School, but fencing must be installed first so gate fees can be collected.

 

Since the YMCA uses the soccer fields, more games could be played. The YMCA could pay more fees for field rental.

 

2.      Collect More Gate Receipts.

 

Currently, volunteer parents from the boys and girls soccer teams sit at a portable table at the corner of the soccer field and try to collect $3 from those who watch the soccer games. Although there is partial fencing around the current soccer and softball diamond, there is not complete fencing, so fans bypass the table where gate receipts are received. 

 

 

C.      Loss of Opportunity for Boys and Girls Soccer

The individual soccer players are losing opportunities to practice and play games because there are not lights on the soccer field. In the 2012 boys’ soccer season, two games were stopped in the middle of the game because of lack of lighting. On another occasion in 2012, a team traveled from Crawfordsville, but since there were rain delays, the game never started because it was getting dark by the time the rain stopped. There could be more boys and girls junior varsity games with more lighting. Often junior varsity games are schedule after varsity games. Often the junior varsity games ended at halftime because it became dark.

 

 

C:\Mitchell Thomas\2012 soccer pictures\100_5773.JPG

 

 

Previous Efforts to Obtain Fencing and Lighting

 

In the Fall of 2005, two soccer parents, Mike Lynch and Mike Montague, prepared a proposal for lights and a fence and presented it the administration of the Clay Community Schools. Duke Energy offered to install wooden light poles at no cost, but the proposal did not move forward.

 

The Current Proposal

 

A.      Lights.

http://www.affordablelighting.com/sports2.jpg

The total budget estimate for lighting equipment and installation at Northview High School was $115,000-$125,000 as of July 27, 2012.  The total budget estimate for equipment and installation at Sullivan High School was $55,000 as of August 11, 2004. Since the estimates are for similar systems, the reason for the increase according to Darren Lambert, a Musco Lighting salesman, is the effect of inflation over 8 years and the improvement of the equipment quality.

 

It is recommended that Northview High School follow the models of Sullivan High School and West Vigo High School followed in 2004 and 2005 related to soccer field lighting. Both schools are in the same conference as Northview. For purposes of this discussion, please refer to Appendix A (Northview) and Appendix B (Sullivan).

 

The first option is whether to purchase new equipment or used equipment. Although the cost is roughly half the cost of new ballasts, the warranty is only for 2 years. New equipment generally has a 20 year warranty.

 

Here is an example of Stadium Lights Currently for Sale on Ebay (January 8, 2012), but notice the warranty is only for 2 years:

 

(8) North Star Lighting 1500 Watt 240V Metal Halide Stadium Flood Sports Light

New Years Special $100 each One Week Only!!!!!!!!

I am selling (1) Lots of (8) lights per lot of a used 1500 Watt 240 volt North Star Lighting Metal Halide Stadium Sports Light. I am also including used lamps with these fixtures. The warranty i am including with these ballasts if 3 years.  They are great for Riding Arenas, Sports field or other similar applications. I am selling them for $100.00 each when purchased in the lot of (8) units per lot. This light retails for over $350.00 from the factory.

Application: 35 to 70 foot Mounting Height

Cost per complete light with bulb and mounting hook when purchased in the quantity listed in this listing: $125.00

Warranty on ballast and capacitor: Two full years. 

My company has been selling used quality lights since 1985. We stand behind what we sell and guarantee your complete satifaction. 

We warranty every light we sell for two full years. 

 

The second option is whether to install 30 foot candle lights or 50 foot candle lights. The 30 foot candle lights are roughly $50,000 less expensive. Both Sullivan High School and West Vigo High School are using the 30 foot candle lights.

 

The third option is whether to use 4 steel poles or 4 wooden poles. For several reasons, steel poles are recommended. Although the initial cost of wooden poles is less, wooden poles tend to become rotten over time and create a safety issue. There is also an aesthetic issue since the light poles on the football, baseball, softball and tennis poles are steel.

 

http://cache4.asset-cache.net/xc/115037507-lightpole-photos-com.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=B53F616F4B95E5537642741B32AED471265FA0DC34682F68A86D48BD4E6E4B6A7F3253EB5DA4A499

 

 

 

 

B.      Fence

 

 

Fencing from a sample soccer field

 

This proposal also includes a request for $10,000 in the 2014 budget for additional fencing around the soccer and softball fields. This will help collecting gate fees for both soccer and softball games. There is partial fencing around both fields, but the fencing around the softball field was installed by DoubleBee fencing located in Terre Haute. There may be less expensive fencing companies available in the Brazil area. According to Rick Livingston, a salesman for DoubleBee, the cost of fence and installation is $10.50 per square foot for 4 foot high fence with medium weight 9 gauge galvanized wire (heavier than residential fence). The cost of fence and installation is $12.50 per square foot for 6 foot high fence with the same medium weight 9 gauge galvanized wire. He suggested that the budget estimate cost to be around $10,000 for both the soccer and softball fields, although he has not measured the fields yet. The cost may be reduced because there is already partial fencing installed on the north and east side of the soccer field and part of the softball field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

C.      Soccer Field Improvements

 

 

Northview Soccer Field

 

This proposal includes a $10,000 request in the 2014 budget for improving the soccer field. First, the field is uneven and contains holes, and therefore a safety concern, in many places. Players can become injured from stepping into the holes. Appropriate equipment is needed to level the playing field. Second, the 2012 drought damaged the Northview High School soccer field, as it did in other parts of Indiana:

The drought that has scorched Central Indiana this summer, combined with the watering ban invoked by Mayor Greg Ballard two weeks ago, has left some area high school football and soccer playing surfaces looking more like dirt fields from the Dust Bowl era. Decatur Central, like many schools in the Indianapolis area, has a synthetic football field. But its soccer game field, directly east of the football stadium, is natural grass. [14]

                       

 Finally, most other soccer fields use Bermuda grass. Bermuda grass is preferred for the reasons given  in this recent  article from a Purdue University Turf Science publication:

 

Turf quality on municipal athletic fields is typically poor due to excessive traffic from soccer and football. These heavily trafficked fields often have compacted soils that reduce turf density. Aside from poor playability and poor turf quality, heavily trafficked sports fields provide less cushion and increase the risk of athlete injury. To counter traffic damage, athletic field managers are forced to overseed worn areas after the football and/or soccer season. This usually occurs in late spring or late fall, neither of which are ideal seeding periods for commonly used cool-season grasses such as perennial ryegrass or Kentucky bluegrass. Additionally, perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass are not well-adapted to warm, humid summers of southern Indiana and southern Illinois. Even if well-established, they are often weak and easily damaged during the summer months.

Bermudagrass is a warm-season turfgrass that may offer a potential solution. Perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass often go dormant during the summer and need time to recuperate in early fall. Conversely, bermudagrass performs well in the summer months and enters the fall playing season healthy and vigorous. Bermudagrass is well-adapted to athletic fields because it has excellent wear tolerance and recuperative ability. In fact, bermudagrass is considered to be the premier turfgrass for athletic fields in the southern United States. Bermudagrass can produce a higher quality athletic turf that has a lower irrigation requirement, more vigorous summer growth, and fewer insect and disease problems than cool-season turfgrasses. Seeding or sprigging bermudagrass in late May or early June instead of seeding a cool-season grass is an alternative for athletic turf. Improvements in the cold-tolerance of seeded and vegetative bermudagrass varieties now allow this turfgrass to be used in southern Indiana and southern Illinois (Table 1).[15]

 

 

Sources of Funding

 

A.      Clay Community Schools

 

The 2013 Clay Community Schools Capital Funds Budget, as approved by the Indiana State Board of Accounts, totals $4,125,988. Indiana Code 20-40-8-12 requires that money used for sports construction, repair, replacement, remodeling, or maintenance of a school sports facility may not exceed five percent (5%) of the property tax revenues levied for the fund in the calendar year. In other words, up to $206,299.40 of the 2012 budget can be used for sports facility construction and repair.

 

The reason this proposal is for the 2014 Capital Funds Budget is because the funds must be included in the budget for the year the money is appropriated.

 

B.      Grants

 

The U.S. Soccer Foundation awards annual grants for soccer field equipment, however this option is not feasible for the Northview High School soccer field lights for these reasons:

·         Grants do not include installation

·         Grants are limited to $50,000

·         Grants are highly competitive. Applicants are from throughout the U.S.

·         Grants are awarded as a credit with Musco Lighting. No cash is distributed for lighting equipment

·         Grants are only awarded once a year. The next eligible award is in 2014.

·         Grants must be submitted through a 501(c)(3) organization (i.e. school corporation.)

·         Grants must have written authorization from the community where the lights are being installed (i.e. school board)

 

The Wabash Valley Community Foundation has grants available for projects such as this, however this is not a feasible option because:

·         The cost of the grant would require extensive time and expense to submit the application

·         Grants are highly competitive

·         National trend of funding cuts for nonprofit associations

·         Grants would not be available for at least one year

 

C.      Community Sponsors

 

The Clay Youth Soccer Club could lead the effort to collect sponsorships from local community businesses to defray some of the cost of these projects, but this option is limited because:

·         Local businesses are already providing financial support for items such as warm ups, equipment, and other items

·         There is no easy way to advertise sponsorships

·         A large number of sponsorships would be required

·         The time and expense of requesting sponsorships for such a large project is overwhelming

 

Thank you for your consideration.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Andrew P. Thomas

33 W. National Ave.

Brazil, IN 47834

Phone: 812-605-0496

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A

Cost per Participant Studies[16]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measures

2004

2005

Multi-Year Average

1

Youth Basketball

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Per Participant

 

$128.46

$128.46

 

Total Cost Per Participant

 

$140.81

$140.81

 

Direct Cost Recovery

 

29.81%

29.81%

 

Total Cost Recovery

 

27.02%

27.02%

 

Sponsorship as Percentage of Total Revenues

 

19.94%

19.94%

 

Average Number of Volunteer Hours per Participant

 

6.8

6.8

 

Percentage of Variable Costs Recovered Through Fees

 

117.48%

117.48%

2

Youth Baseball

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Per Participant

$100.66

$114.65

$107.66

 

Total Cost Per Participant

 

$117.81

$117.81

 

Direct Cost Recovery

45.54%

44.73%

45.14%

 

Total Cost Recovery

 

44.49%

44.49%

 

Sponsorship as Percentage of Total Revenues

28.74%

26.48%

27.61%

 

Average Number of Volunteer Hours per Participant

14.57

12.51

13.54

 

Percentage of Variable Costs Recovered Through Fees

119.53%

120.78%

120.16%

3

Youth Softball

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Per Participant

$138.18

$132.78

$135.48

 

Total Cost Per Participant

 

$155.37

$155.37

 

Direct Cost Recovery

39.24%

47.78%

43.51%

 

Total Cost Recovery

 

38.33%

38.33%

 

Sponsorship as Percentage of Total Revenues

26.60%

29.50%

28.05%

 

Average Number of Volunteer Hours per Participant

12.48

8.82

10.65

 

Percentage of Variable Costs Recovered Through Fees

114.50%

113.68%

114.09%

4

Youth Soccer - Fall

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Per Participant

$94.56

 

$94.56

 

Total Cost Per Participant

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Recovery

72.72%

 

72.72%

 

Total Cost Recovery

 

 

 

 

Sponsorship as Percentage of Total Revenues

7.85%

 

7.85%

 

Average Number of Volunteer Hours per Participant

5.98

 

5.98

 

Percentage of Variable Costs Recovered Through Fees

166.95%

 

166.95%

5

Youth Soccer - Spring

 

 

 

 

Direct Cost Per Participant

$77.39

$82.19

$79.79

 

Total Cost Per Participant

 

$97.35

$97.35

 

Direct Cost Recovery

68.80%

54.17%

61.49%

 

Total Cost Recovery

 

50.75%

50.75%

 

Sponsorship as Percentage of Total Revenues

18.99%

19.13%

19.06%

Average Number of Volunteer Hours per Participant

6.51

3.03

4.77

 

Percentage of Variable Costs Recovered Through Fees

164.88%

122.28%

143.58%

 

 

Appendix B

Clay Community Schools

Capital Projects Fund Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix C

Northview High School

Light Budget Estimate by Musco Lighting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix D

Sullivan High School

Light Budget Estimate by Musco Lighting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix E

Northview High School Soccer Field

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\IMG_0092.JPG

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\West Vigo Soccer Field\IMG_0098.JPG

 

 

 

Appendix F

Sullivan High School Soccer Field

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\Sullivan Soccer Field 12-17-12\IMG_0121.JPG

 

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\Sullivan Soccer Field 12-17-12\IMG_0129.JPG

 

Appendix G

West Vigo High School Soccer Field

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\West Vigo Soccer Field\IMG_0111.JPG

 

C:\Soccer\Soccer field lights\West Vigo Soccer Field\IMG_0115.JPG

 

 

 

 

Appendix H

Northview shocks visiting Terre Haute South

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Brazil Times

(Photo)

Northview's Sean Brockman scored a goal for the Knights in Tuesday's win over Terre Haute South.

Times Staff Report

Confidence is a big factor in sports and with sectionals approaching for high school soccer, the Northview boy's soccer team scored a big win over Terre Haute South on Tuesday evening. The Knights tallied a pair of goals, the second as time ran out on the clock to pick up a 2-0 win over the Braves, a potential sectional foe.

The teams played to a first half draw at 0-0, which gave the Knights' confidence a boost according to coach Dustin Jorgensen.

"I told the guys at halftime that we looked better, we were better, and we were going to beat them tonight," Jorgensen commented.

In the second half, Sean Brockman gave the Knights the advantage when he broke free on a run and scored his team's opening goal with 30 minutes left in the contest.

Playing with the lead, Jorgensen noted that keeping that advantage was a big task against the Braves.

"I begged and pleaded for everyone to play behind the ball and not let up," Jorgensen said. "Everyone was up to the task. Chandler Reeves came up huge with save after save to protect that lead."

With the defense maintaining the one-goal advantage, KJ Thomas helped finalize the win as he was fouled in the penalty area and drew a penalty kick. Kaleb Baker stepped up and drilled home the second score of the game for the Knights.

(Photo)

KJThomas drew a late penalty that resulted in a penalty kick and the second goal for Northview.

"The players did what I asked and we really needed this. To beat a team like this, the week before sectionals, it's awesome," Jorgensen said. "I'm so proud of all my players. They all believed in this. They showed tonight what we are capable of. We need to ride this momentum down to Owen Valley on Thursday, and then take it to sectionals."

Thomas, Trey Boor, Zach Rodgers and David Joslyn each had one shot while Brockman posted four and Derek Snyder had five in the victory. Reeves had 15 shots in goal for the Knights.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix I

Northview boys top Owen Valley

Friday, September 28, 2012

Brazil Times

Times Staff Report

SPENCER -- The Northview boy's soccer team completed the regular season with a road win at Owen Valley on Thursday evening, 2-0.

The Knights had their chances in the first half, but weren't able to get on the board despite seven shots on net.

"We've been working on set pieces and Mark Underwood and KJ Thomas ran a beautiful play off a free kick that nearly got us a goal," Northview coach Dustin Jorgensen said. "It was nice to see them applying the things we've been focusing on at practice. Our communication was lacking in the first half and that was a big part of the halftime conversation. That, and being smart with possession."

Northview scored its first goal off a throw-in by Antoney Bryan as Mark Underwood flicked the ball in front of the net with a header where Derek Snyder finished the job for a 1-0 advantage.

"After a few minutes on the bench I put Derek Snyder back in the game as a forward. He brought some great energy in the game when he went back in," Jorgensen said. "We've been working on scoring opportunities from throw-ins when we're in the attacking third. It paid off."

The second score came off a heads up play by Underwood, who used a free kick to score as he took Owen Valley's defense and keeper by surprise with a quick kick.

"This was a great way to end our conference season and get ready for sectionals. We'll play the winner of Owen Valley and Terre Haute North for our first game. We've got confidence now, we'll just need to show up and execute," Jorgensen said. "The regular season certainly had ups and downs, but I'm proud of how these guys stuck to it. They didn't give up and throw in the towel when we had a rough start. They listened, worked hard, and applied what we worked on at practice to their games. I'm looking forward to next week."

Offensively, Snyder had four shots for the Knights with Bryan, Underwood and Sean Brockman adding two apiece. Zach Rodgers posted one shot for Northview.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix J

Knights end regular season with soccer victory

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Brazil Times

(Photo)

Northview's Melissa Lummis (No. 16)heads a ball that is punched a way by Owen Valley keeper Kaitlin Keller. [Order this photo]

By CAREY FOX

Times Sports Editor

The Northview girl's soccer team wrapped up the regular season by stopping visiting Owen Valley in a 6-0 conference shutout that gave the Knights a 4-2 WIC mark.

(Photo)

The Knights' Haley Zadeii brings the ball up the field and had two assists.

The Knights used a three-goal outburst over a six minute span of the second half to put away the Patriots as Hannah Minor finished off a hat trick and Haley Zadeii added a pair of assists in the victory.

The lion's share of play took place in the Owen Valley defensive zone as the Knights' front line of Olivia Fulton, Brittany Fagg, Minor, Zadeii and Allison McWilliams continued to pressure the Patriots. Melissa Lummis was the first to find the net for Northview as she took a pass from Fagg to the penalty area and directed it home eight minutes into the contest.

A corner kick from Minor nine minutes later nearly curled into the net as Lummis headed it in, but the goal was disallowed as the ball was ruled out of play. McWilliams fired a hard shot on net that was saved moments later as Northview continued to press the net.

With 13 minutes left in the half, Minor took a pass from Kaysia Reberger and chipped the ball over the keeper for a 2-0 Knights' lead at the half.

"We definitely created plenty of opportunities in the first half," Northview coach Lauren Trennel said. "We just couldn't execute well enough, but we eventually found the back of the net. We're pleased with that."

Alexis Bender and Zadeii each had good chances saved in the first half and on defense, Sydney Buell staved off a long run by the Patriots' Meghan Terrell.

In the second half, the Knights kept up the pressure as Lummis caromed a shot off the post and had a header off a corner kick saved once again.

Northview began to find more success with some of its longer shots on goal as Olivia Fulton scored the game's third goal with 17:11 left. Bender would score four minutes later after taking a pass from Zadeii and serving a long shot over the keeper's outstretched arms. Barely a minute later, Minor scored her second goal of the game with another long-distance shot, just under the crossbar.

"I really like the fact that the girls pushed forward and when they realized the opportunity wasn't there, they dropped it back and elected to put it over the top," Trennel said. "First half we had a little bit of an issue with that," Trennel said of moving the ball side-to-side. "We corrected it at halftime and were looking to switch it a lot more"

The final score of the game came with just 15 seconds left as Zadeii passed to Minor for a score and the victory.

Mannah Mace didn't receive much action in net, making two saves in the first half before giving way to Lummis late in the contest.

The Knights (7-7-1 overall) will face Terre Haute South on Thursday on the Braves home field at 5 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix K

Northview girls edge past North Knox

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Brazil Times

(Photo)

Northview senior Alexis Bender crosses a ball from the sideline during the Knights' victory against North Knox on Thursday. [Order this photo]

By CAREY FOX

Times Sports Editor

One evening after the goals piled up for the Northview girl's soccer team, the Knights had to do with just one against visiting North Knox. However, that proved to be just enough as Northview held off a late charge by the Warriors for a 1-0 home victory.

The win improves the Knights to 3-1 overall heading into a home match against Southmont on Monday evening.

The Knights had plenty of chances in the game, including 26 shots before halftime, but several nice saves by the North Knox keeper and a variety of deflections kept the game scoreless until late in the first half.

Northview forwards Hannah Minor, Libby Deckard, Kaysia Reberger and Melissa Lummis kept the pressure on up front as the ball remained in the Warriors half of the field for much of the opening 40 minutes. However, coach Lauren Trennel wasn't satisfied with her team's ability to finish off their chances.

"Our biggest problem as far as execution, was that we were creating opportunities, but when we took the shots we took them as if we were sending long balls," Trennel said of the offense. "We weren't driving the ball and keeping it low. We were sending it over the top or high and wide. So that was something that we told them to focus on in the second half."

Minor had several chances during the early stages of the half and the Knights banged one shot off the cross bar in the opening minutes. Deckard nearly found Lummis charging to the net 15 minutes in, but the chip shot was sent just wide of the net. Nine minutes later the Knights had a point blank shot by Courtney Maccarone deflected wide to keep the match scoreless.

"There were situations where we had the opportunity to receive the ball and we looked to switch it, but then we would pull it back and then we turn around and want to go switch it when we could have taken the shot sooner," Trennel said. "We created more work for ourselves."

That work would finally pay off in the waning minutes before halftime to give the Knights a positive result.

(Photo)

Northview senior Allison McWilliams (No. 5)battles past a North Knox defender during first half action.[Order this photo]

Lummis would be the one to give the Knights the lead with 6:52 remaining before halftime as a Brittany Fagg pass found her in front of the net. Lummis was able to poke it to the corner past the Warrior keeper to put Northview out front 1-0 at the break.

After the break, the Knights maintained their pressure on North Knox as both Minor, who had a team-high 10 shots, and Allison McWilliams had shots saved. Minor fired another shot off the cross bar six minutes into the half as Lummis was upended going for the rebound.

North Knox finally began to add some pressure of its own as Hannah Drake made a long run that was eventually thwarted by the Knights. However, perhaps the biggest play of the game was made by Northview keeper Mannah Mace.

The Warriors' Emily Cook broke free in the Knights' half of the field and was able to outrun Northview's defenders on a breakaway. As Cook dribbled into the box, Mace came out and stole the ball off the Warrior's foot for a potential game-saver.

"She came up huge on that one that she came out on," Trennel said of her sophomore keeper. "That's something that we've worked with her on, coming out and going to the ground for the ball and taking it off a player's foot. She does enjoy being in goal, but traditionally, she's a field player. Both her and Melissa Lummis have stepped up for us this season since Haley (Zadeii) broke her wrist. We're fortunate to have three players that are an asset to us on the field and in goal."

Northview caught a bit of a break three minutes later as North Knox' Kalena Wagner was taken down in the box to draw a penalty kick with 15 minutes remaining. However, the ensuing kick by Drake was sent high over the goal as Northview stayed out front the remainder of the way.

Appendix L

Soccer players raise money for trip

Friday, February 3, 2012

By JASON MOON, Managing Editor

(Photo)

Members of the Clay County "England Bound Soccer Team" include (from left) Mitchell Thomas, Mark Underwood, KJ Thomas and Chandler Reeves.

Four Brazil youth and their parents are currently raising money for a trip of a lifetime.

Northview High School soccer players Mitchell Thomas, KJ Thomas and Chandler Reeves -- all freshmen -- along with sophomore Mark Underwood, are in the process of raising the needed funds for a trip to England to take part in the 2012 GotSoccer International Cup.

Mitchell Thomas is the son of Andy Thomas and Jackie Mayle, while Underwood is the son of Max and Theresa Underwood. KJ Thomas is the son of Norman and Susie Thomas and Reeves is the son of Bill and Lea Anne Reeves.

Andy Thomas, who will serve as a chaperone during the trip, said the players were invited to the tournament by a team based in Atlanta.

Andy said he made the necessary contacts through the website, gotsport.com, which was advertising the tourney.

"(The team from Atlanta) has been there before," Andy said.

The group began raising funds in December and plans at least one fundraiser per month through July. The four players and their chaperones will leave July 19 and return July 30.

Andy said estimated cost for the trip was $1,500 per player plus airfare. The fundraising goal is $12,000 total.

A chili dinner has been scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 11, from 11 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Kennedy Crossing Bingo Center. Cost is $5 for adults and $3 for children 10-under.

In addition to chili, Andy said desserts would be available as well as tea and lemonade.

"We will also be looking for sponsors for the trip to help support the trip," Andy said. "And we are working with the (YCMA of Clay County) to set up a soccer camp to help raise money."

While in England, the players and chaperones will also have the opportunity to visit several historical sites, including Stonehenge, Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, the Tower of London, and more.

The GotSoccer International Cup Tournament was set up by former soccer professional Edward "Ted" MacDougall.

MacDougall is perhaps best known for scoring nine goals while playing for Bournemouth after the team defeated Margate, 11-0, in 1971. He currently is the coach for the Atlanta Silverbacks, a squad that plays in the North American Soccer League.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix M

Soccer Team Volunteering in the Brazil Community

Soccer Squad

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Brazil Times

(Photo)

Northview High School soccer players KJ Thomas, Tristen Raybould, Mitch Thomas, Mike Thomas, Caleb McGinty, Garrett Wiss, Jake Nobles, Guy Wiss and Chandler Reeves are pictured with Rosemary Price at the Brazil Senior Citizen Center, 120 S. Franklin St., Brazil, where members of the team volunteer twice a month. The senior center houses one of the city's oldest food pantries. As well as helping out at the center, the soccer squad will conduct their season banquet at the facility in November and will also collect food donations for the pantry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix N

 

Lighting Standards

Of The

US Soccer Foundation

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Appendix O

US Soccer Foundation Grant



[1]www.Wikipedia.com

[2]New World Encyclopedia

[3]Tavi Mounsithiraj is the head men’s soccer coach at Goshen College and also serves as the executive director of the Goshen Youth Soccer Organization (GYSO).Who We Are: Soccer's popularity keeps growing, The Goshen News, March 8, 2012

[4] U.S. Youth Soccer Association

[5]“Yes, Soccer Is America's Game,” Bill Saporito, Thursday, June 3, 2010AnonymousThe Goshen News

[6] U.S. Youth Soccer Association        

[7]Director of Governmental Research and Service , Institute for Public Service and Policy Research, 1600 Hampton Street, Room 402, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Phone: (803) 777-9788, Fax (803) 777-4575, e-mail: wetomes@mailbox.sc.edu

[8]www.wikipedia.com

[9]Lawrence Soccer Complex, by Cindy Paul, Children

[10] Indiana Soccer Foundation, http://www.soccerindiana.org

 

[11] Deb Plummer, Executive Director, Clay Co YMCA

 

 

[12]JR Justesen, PT, RCAMT, CSCS, CGIMS, Physiotherapist, Soccer Coach, Soccer Injury Consultant, Director, Goal-Tek Innovations Ltd., Edited by Kevin Burr Ph.D

[13]Severe Injuries in Football Players Influencing Factors, Jiri Chomiak, MD*, Astrid Junge, PhD†, Lars Peterson, MD‡ and Jiri Dvorak, MD.

 

[14]Indianapolis Star Online, July 24, 2012

[15]Purdue University Turf Science, Department of Agronomy, www.agry.purdue.edu/turf

[16]Source:Director of Governmental Research and Service Institute for Public Service and Policy Research, 1600 Hampton Street, Room 402, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Phone: (803) 777-9788, Fax (803) 777-4575. , e-mail: wetomes@mailbox.sc.edu. In 1996, eleven cities were asked to participate in the pilot phase of the South Carolina Municipal Benchmarking Project based on demographic representation across the state, interest in measuring organizational performance, and their demonstrated leadership abilities in encouraging and sustaining organizational participation in such a project. With the technical assistance of the University of South Carolina's Institute for Public Service and Policy Research, the cities of Aiken, Anderson, Clemson, Florence, Georgetown, Myrtle Beach, North Augusta, Orangeburg, Rock Hill, Spartanburg, and Walterboro agreed to commit their resources to the three-year pilot project and work to accomplish the following deliverables: